RSS

Author Archives: Steve Eulberg

About Steve Eulberg

A performing, touring acoustic musician, Steve co-owns DulcimerCrossing.com and teaches on that site. He also teaches guitar and baritone ukelele at [my]talentforge.com and several styles and levels of guitar at JamPlay.com.

Introducing New Fiddle Instructor

Introducing New Fiddle Instructor

by Steve Eulberg & Linda Ratcliff

DulcimerCrossing is pleased to introduce our newest instructor: Vi Wickam  (Learn more about Vi on the Teacher’s Page or click on the video below:

ViIntoCover

Vi Wickam is a 3rd generation fiddler from Colorado. He has finished in the finals at the Grand Master Fiddling Championship and has also taught there. Together with Steve Eulberg, he is the other half of the band, Fiddle Whamdiddle. He is also the host and owner of mytalentforge.com which features in-depth fiddle lessons, guitar (and some dulcimer lessons by Steve.) Click HERE to see Vi’s introductory video.

Vi is starting off by teaching several of the fiddle tunes that were recorded on the Old School Old-Times albumn by Fiddle Whamdiddle.
Fiddle Whamdiddle
Are you saying, “I know what a fiddle is but what is a whamdiddle?”  The whamdiddle is a slang name for the hammered dulcimer; “hog fiddle” is a slang name for the mountain dulcimer, both are traditional American folk instruments.  Together with the fiddle they make for a porch-picking, knee-slapping good time.

 

To purchase the CD only

To purchase the Book

To purchase the Downloadable Book & CD Combo
Here is the list of the fiddle lessons uploaded so far.

 

 

Tags: , , ,

Tuning Hack for Scroll-Headed Dulcimer

Tuning Hack for Scroll-Headed Dulcimer

by Steve Eulberg

The Snark™ tuner is very popular with mountain dulcimer players, for good reason.  It is quick, accessible, accurate and it’s display is very readable.

(This is not an insignificant feature as those of us who continue gathering service stripes in the playing of our dulcimers experience with eyesight that gets weary over time!)

IMG_2445And the handy clip-on feature works very well with flathead mountain dulcimers.

However, players of instruments with the traditional scroll have sometimes struggled with how to attach the tuning clip to the dulcimer so that it can “read” the vibrations and convert them into electricity which then displays how close our vibrating strings are to the desired pitch.

Therefore, when one of my students whose dulcimer has a beautiful, traditional scrollhead showed up for her lesson displaying the tuning hack here, I was delighted and decided I needed to share it right away!

IMG_2444By using her capo on the scroll, she had a location on which to clip her tuner that picked up the vibrations directly and accurately!

She clipped on tuned up and was ready for her lesson in no time!

(This is all the more important, because dulcimers players have taken and adhere to the dulcimer pledge which commits them to the joys of playing their instruments in many different tunings!)

 

Tags: , , ,

Wendy Songe Premium Concert Highlight

Wendy Songe Premium Concert Highlight

We are so excited to Wendy Songe was able to play a Concert Window show for our Premium DulcimerCrossing Members in February!

Erin Mae Lewis, one of our instructors, is in the process of scheduling the Live Events Calendar for the remainder of the year.

Basic Members have access to Live Events once a quarter and Premium Members have access once a month!

 
 

Tags: ,

My Grass Is Blue

My Grass Is Blue
by Linda Ratcliff
Steve is introducing a new series of lessons at Dulcimer Crossing –
I’ve gone camping to attend bluegrass festivals, and in the evening – all the musicians like to gather around the campfire and jam.  
But, I have to be honest, my hammered dulcimer has been less than welcome at jams.  
People look at me with suspicion until they’ve heard my backup style.  In this series of lessons,
Steve demonstrates how dulcimer players can fit right in with bluegrass jammers – by learning to play chop chords like a mandolin player.

My favorite part of this lesson comes when Steve teaches  (Read More)

Join DulcimerCrossing today and have access to the 20 video lessons in the first part of this ongoing series!

 

Tags:

Take More Risks

Take More Risks

by Linda Ratcliff

The biggest risk a person can take is to not take one at all.


Take More Risks

The great thing about New Year’s resolutions is that you can set new goals to improve yourself. That being said – this year, why don’t you take more risks with your dulcimer playing. Here are just a few ideas.
  • Learn to play new tunes.
  • Try picking out a tune by ear, instead of relying on your tablature.
  • Take a song you already know, and make it your own with a new arrangement.
  • Practice with a different tuning on your mountain dulcimer.
  • Better yet, buy a second mountain dulcimer, so you can keep one in each tuning.
  • Learn a new style of music on your dulcimer, like the “Blues” or “Bluegrass.”
  • Play your first solo in front of friends.
  • Play your first solo in front of strangers.
  • Go to an out-of-town weekend dulcimer festival, and meet other dulcimer players.
  • Sign up for private dulcimer lessons. If there’s not a teacher in your area, you can always Skype with one of our instructors.
  • Most important of all … have fun with your dulcimer.

You have an entire year – go for it!

If you have any questions, always feel free to ask Steve or myself.

Happy dulcimering,
Linda

Bridging the Gap Between What You Know … And Where You Want Your Music to Go

GO FOR IT!  JOIN DULCIMERCROSSING.COM

Featured Image from:

http://alidavies.com/taking-risks-essential-part-success/

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 1, 2017 in lessons, subscriber news

 

Tags: , ,

Advent Dulcimer Devotions return…

Advent Dulcimer Devotions return…

by Steve Eulberg

Imagine this:  A weekly email playing gentle music of instrumental ensembles featuring dulcimers, with a message of preparation that is serene, clear-sighted and hope-filled–an anti-dote to the crazed, blurry-eyed busyness of Christmas preparations (that began in some locations back in October.)

Advent is the 4-week season in the Christian tradition that marks the beginning of a new year in the life of the “called-out” people of God known as the church.  While we gather and prepare to celebrate the birth of a savior, we also gather and prepare for the return of the savior in the days when the light from the sun is shortest each day.  (In the northern hemisphere, that is.)

This is free and available to you and anyone with whom you share this link!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on November 27, 2016 in special event, subscriber news

 

Tags: , ,

“Prepared to be Lucky”

“Prepared to be Lucky”

luckyjoesinteriorby Steve Eulberg

Lucky Joe’s Sidewalk Saloon, in Fort Collins, Colorado, is one of the places I began honing my craft of performing in live venues at the end of the last century.

As soon as church was over in the morning, I would phone in to get my name put on the Open Mic list for what I hoped would be the prime time after the weekly Acoustic Open Mic began at 9 pm every Sunday Night.

Sometimes I was “lucky” and my name was earlier on the list, so I could listen to a few of the other players, play my set and get home to take my shower (this was before the local Clean Air Act banned smoking in bars in 2003).  If I didn’t take that shower, my sensible wife would not let my smoky-smelling self sleep in the same bed!  (I guess, twice lucky–the couch was none-too-comfortable for a night’s sleep.)

Other nights, the list was nearly full when I called in and I got to play much closer to closing time….which made the required shower much e-e-e-arlier in the morning.

Many of the performers were guitarists and singer-songwriters, although I do recall a stride pianist coming in and playing some mean Jelly Roll Morton, too.  Sometimes I would bring my guitar and try out some new songs, to test them in front of a rather discerning audience.

Many other times, I brought my mountain or hammered dulcimer up on that little stage (which provided the host and sound guy the opportunity to learn how to amplify these feedback boxes on the fly!) to introduce their delicate and lively sounds to the beer-sipping audience.  (To their intrigue and delight.)

I don’t know how the other performers used the time they were not performing, but this was a laboratory for me.

I studied them, their material, how they presented it, how the audience did (or didn’t) respond.  I prepared my nervous heart to calm itself as my time slot neared and I tried to make my set up time be efficient.  I listened to (and made internal comments on) everyone’s stage patter, and tried to edit my own in light of my quick reflections on theirs.

And I was lucky.

Joe (half of Lucky Joe’s) booked me to play for a couple of St. Patrick’s Day gigs and one year I rode on the saloon’s float in the pre St. Patrick’s Day Saturday morning parade in March (this is Colorado, remember, and March is one of the big snow-dump months every year!), playing my hammered dulcimer, wearing finger-less gloves as the float bounced down College Avenue.

But mostly I was lucky because I learned that all this preparation is what made me lucky.

(with thanks to Twyla Tharp for sharing E. B. White’s quote:

“Habitually creative people are prepared to be lucky.”

The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life.)

 

 

Tags: , , ,